During the takeoff and landing of many commercial jets, flaps on the wings extend for the duration of time it takes the aircraft to reach cruising altitude. While these wing flaps deploy for a small portion of flight, they serve the important purpose of altering the entire shape of the wing. This small adjustment redirects airflow over the wing and greatly improves takeoff and landing capabilities. This blog will explore this small but impactful feature of flight to understand why so many planes employ extended wing flaps.


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While many modern aircraft now take advantage of advanced and powerful gas turbine engines that have revolutionized flight as we know it, a large number of models still utilize reciprocating engines that have served aviation endeavors since the first powered flight. While the original engines for heavier-than-air aircraft, reciprocating engines are extremely advanced with a number of components that work together to make flight possible. In this blog, we will discuss aircraft reciprocating engines in more detail, allowing you to have a better understanding of their general design, variations, and uses.


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When an aircraft is preparing to take off or has just landed at an airport, it is important that they are able to safely move across the runway as necessary while accommodating any nearby aircraft that also need to use such spaces. When an aircraft traverses a ground service, it is known as taxiing. While the pilot plays a pivotal role in controlling the aircraft on the ground, they often rely on the direction provided by a taxi signalman to safely move. In this blog, we will discuss the taxiing of an aircraft, allowing you to better understand how pilots and signalmen work together to safely conduct operations.


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Pilots are using more advanced technologies than before, many of which have revolutionized the way they conduct flight operations. One major example of this is the debut of GPS navigation. GPS (global positioning system) technology has had an exponential growth rate in aviation use over recent years because it offers faster access to data and better accuracy for navigating around airports or other confined spaces where traditional technology falls short.


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A properly functioning head gasket is a critical component in an internal combustion engine. Unfortunately, it is also one of the items most prone to damage and replacement. Since replacements can be costly, knowing some diagnostic and repair techniques is important. In this blog, we will discuss the function of a head gasket, some signs that it may be close to failure, and a few repair tips.


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Fasteners are mechanical devices that are tasked with joining two or more objects together. Often found in countless assemblies, they are integral components that are available in a number of types. Compact in design and with a low profile, we will be discussing self-clinching fasteners, a type of fastener used in a diverse set of applications.


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An internal combustion engine is a heat engine that generates motive power by burning a fuel-air mixture within the engine, and the resulting hot gases drive a piston or do other work as they expand. Due to their incredible durability and drivability, an outstanding 250 million highway transportation vehicles in the United States are equipped with an internal combustion engine. 


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Communication systems are an essential part of a safely operating aircraft. With over 3,000 flights taking off each day in the U.S. alone, there must be a steady flow of communication between aircraft and control towers. While many components go into an aircraft's communication system


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When it comes to any project, screws and bolts are integral components for the proper functions of most operations. While the two are often conflated, it is important to point out their distinguishing properties.


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For the standard operations of modern aircraft, gas turbine engines are one of the most common types of powerplants. Situated under the aircraft wings or tail structures, gas turbine engines serve to compress and ignite fuel-and-air mixtures to create the energy needed to achieve forward propulsion. As the creation of exhaust with the combustor results in hot streams of gas, it is crucial that all structures are specifically built to withstand such extreme conditions.


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